Posts Tagged ‘plough plane

31
Jan
09

Episode 12 – Hand Planes, Part 2

Specialty Planes

tools-014

Veritas Skewed Rabbet plane. Not skewered rabbit. NO.

The Web’s Only Totally Galoot Podcast(tm) continues our journey through the drawer of hand planes by picking up and examining the scrub plane. So many of these planes are made from old smoothers, and I thought I had an original idea. Someday I’ll be able to afford the LN 40. Maybe. Our next stop is with the variety of rabbet and plough (plow) planes available today. I’ve become a huge fan of Veritas’ skewed rabbet plane, shown here on the right.

norris-infill-shoulder-no-7

Norris No.-7 Infill

There are actually all kinds of ways to cut rabbets and dados, and to plough grooves (to dado is to groove a trench that run perpendicular to the grain, and to plough is to to groove a trench parallel to the grain,) including using knives to score the borders and chisels to remove the waste, but this is admittedly long and tedious in process, and not particularly accurate over the long haul (DAMHIKT.) We therefore turn to rabbet, shoulder, fillister (moving and/or standing), and plough planes to get the job done. On the left is a Norris No.-7 infill shoulder plane, the object of many a poor Galoot’s lust.

stanley-48

A crispy Stanley No.-48 match plane, for a match made in heaven.

The match plane is the traditional name for the plane that makes tongues and grooves. Prior to today’s wonder glues, tongue and groove construction was just about as strong as it gets in terms of joining the edges of boards together, since glue really isn’t much of a factor. In the old farmhouse we live in, for example, the floors are all dry tongue and groove, and since they were installed 90 years ago they have each shrunk despite best efforts to maintain a finish on them (cheezy linoleum aside.) Wood shrinks the greatest at its width, and as each plank shrinks it tends to pull back from its neighbor. Having the tongue in between the planks keeps (or at least slows down) the breezes from blowing up through between the planks. FWIW, all the ceilings are beaded board tongue and groove as well. These are photos of my extremely cool Stanley No.-48 match plane, which makes making perfect tongues and grooves extremely easy.

Stanley 98-99

Stanley No.-98, No.-99 Side Rabbet planes. For planing your side rabbets.

The Sanley No.-98 and No.-99 are kind of the standard by which other side rabbet planes are judged, and they are always very welcome in the tool chest. The reason is not hard to understand; if you plough your dado at exactly 5/8″, but you find out your stock is 17/32″, you can choose to plane your stock, which will necessitate re-thicknessing the stock you are woorking on, and need more effort because the stock has probably got a lot more surface area than the dado sides have. Whip one of these babies out, get after the side of the dado, and in no time its just like the woodworking elves have taken care of the problem for you, while you were sleeping. Even those recovering Normites that use dado stacks set up for birch plywood purchased from a Blue Big Box store and then go to their plywood stash and grab an old piece of Orange Big Box store birch plywood for something like that… oh, say… one last shelf in some, just for example, shop furniture project along the lines of, just for example, say, a Spagnuolo-inspired torsion-box assembly table, just off the top of my head… could use one of these with differing plywood widths. You would have to find a 98 or 99 set up for the metric system, however. I’m really glad that nothing like that has happened to me, thought. (Whew!)

I wish we had time, space, etc. to cover all the arcane and even weird planes out there. We have an increasing number of extremely high quality plane makers that are turning out heirloom-quality stuff, and the ones I’ve met are so cool because they love woodworking and they love being with Galoots and talking about woodworking. I need to lift up at least a couple of them for attention. First up is Jim Leamy, who seriously didn’t mind that I was flat broke and that his planes are worth more than my wife’s car, he just wanted to chat with me. I’m afraid that I’m usually a better conversant – I was rather busy staring at his work. These are only a couple of his planes:

jim-leamy-center-wheel2

Jim Leamy's Center Wheel Plough Plane

jim-leamy-mahogany_plow_2

Jim Leamy's Mahogany Plough. Yup, accents are ivory. I-v-o-r-y.

jim-leamys-ultimate

Jim Leamy's Ultimate model. Wonder how it got THAT name...

Please visit my hand plane web pages for a list of great links!

Oh yeah, the Podcast:




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