Posts Tagged ‘workshop

03
Mar
09

Episode 15 – An Open and Shut Case

Think back to the times that you’ve been visiting a very cool historical old Fort, or a re-enactment village such as Old Sturbridge Village or Colonial Willamsburg, or something along that ilk. As your cup is coming near to running over with information overload and an imagination that’s lagging behind you 300 years or so (and perhaps the kids are getting antsy,) the next threshold brings you into a space where woodworking took place. In the midst of dust settling from generations-old rough-hewn rafters to the burnished floorboards there sits a tool chest, carefully arranged by loving curators to depict the Galoot’s dream. Suddenly your fatigue is gone and your attention is riveted.

seatonchst1

Reproduction of Benjamin Seaton's tool chest. He didn't use it much, and that's why it's well preserved.

The tool chest was more than mere organization to the old ones. It was a sales brochure and an industry efficiency expert rolled into one. On the right, of course, is a reproduction of the tool chest of Benjamin Seaton, as described in the podcast. Notice the chisel tills in the top bin of the sliding till, and the fixed till securly holding the smaller saws. Also notice the rope handles — there is some conjecture that some chests were made with handles long enough that a pike might be slid through each and the chest carried that way. I suppose it’s possible, but then, I don’t need to carry this chest.

What is not visible is, of course, the fixed tills in the bottom of the chest. They often hold larger tools such as bitstocks (braces), and so forth. I use a Stanley No.-8 for my jointing plane; that takes up half of the cabinet, it seems!

studley

The tool chest of H.O. Studley. I hope he was as good at finding the wall studs as he was at fixing pianos!

On the left is the famous tool chest of H.O. Studley. Not only would most Galoots trade their first born for the tool chest, there are a lot of insecure Galoots that would love to have is name, too! There are at least 300 tools in that box, and I’ve heard claims as many as 400, but I have no way of counting them all since a lot of them are nested. Certainly this is not the tool chest of the average home woodworker.

I recently ran across a photo of a rigger’s tool chest on the web. Perhaps my strongest passion is sailboats (ironic, being stuck in the Hill Country of Texas, don’t you think?) Tradtional sailboats in particular fascinate me, and when we limit ourselves to not using unstayed carbon masts and high-tech rod rigging we enter the realm of “the rigger”. Jamie White is just such a man, out of the Sausalito area, and has quite a bit of interesting information on worming, parceling and serving (pirate talk in background, arr.. arr…)

riggers-tool-chest

Tool chest of James White, the Rigger. Built with rigour.

Jamie is the real thing, spending a few years “before the mast” on “square riggers” – this should be intersesting even for the lubberly of you. Most relevant is his tool chest, and I’ve swiped a photo to include here. Even the able seamen of today require a tool chest, and no Snap-On for Mr. White, thank you very much. Notice his name inscribed in the front of the chest, and the coachwhpped handles – much more comfortable than hemp rope, to be sure. Notice also the photo background – below the weather deck of a wooden sailing vessel. (Arr… arr…)

toolcabinet1

Wall hanger. Lots more room for "customization" here, a couple of dozen more boring tools...

Our final exhibit is of a hanging tool chest. I’ve forgotten where I lifted this photo from, but this well-crafted tool chest is typical of the hanging tool chests many Galoots construct for their own use. If you are contemplating a tool chest at this point, consider that each of these and the photos of the hundreds of those out their on the web were all built as solutions to the individual Galoot’s needs. Your tool chest needs to be as personal as your shop space and your work bench — there is no right or wrong in tool chests. Let your tool storage be your sales brochure!

And here’s the podcast:

27
Feb
09

Episode 14 – The Well-Dressed Bench

Dressed up like a million dollar trouper
Trying hard to look like Gary Cooper
Super duper
Come let’s mix where Rockefellers walk with sticks
Or “um-ber-ellas” in their mitts
Puttin’ on the Ritz…

This week we are covering tap dancing; do you see Fred Astaire dancing around like he’s on strings? Okay, well, go rent old movies. They’re wonderful. And it’s okay, too, because we are Galoots — Retro ‘R Us.

ms-holdfast_big

An example of a holdfast in action, and another one on hold... (These are Gramercy Tools offerings.)

This week we are covering bench accoutrements, what the English call appliances and Americans often call them fixtures. These are work bench supplements that help us hold our stock while we work it.

No appliance is really more simple than the holdfast. We just slip our holdfast into a dog hole, or holdfast hole if we use square dogs, apply what Moxon calls the “Beak” to our stuff, and give it a rap at the bend point. The stuff will be held fast. I’ve found that it pays to keep a couple of them around, for they save a lot on your knees. Seriously — you don’t have to climb up on the bench to sit on your workpiece, and you don’t have to jamb your knees jumping down!

bench-hook

The humble, noble, wonderful, simple, bench hook.

I like simple tools. No, that’s not exactly precise; I am enthralled with simple tools, and the simpler the more the attraction. Among the simplest is the bench hook; make it right it your own shop — no one sells these things and that’s because most tool vendors have conciences. You can even make effective bench hooks out of scrap plywood you have laying around, and come to think of it that’s not a bad idea. Mine is made out of 3/4 oak, with each cleat 3/4 x 3/4. I made up another bench hook by cutting 1-1/2″ off of one side of my hook and fastening 3/4 x 3/4 cleats identical to the bench hook itself – a mini bench hood. The idea is that when I work longer stock I can put something with identical dimentions to the main bench hook at the other end of the bench, or somewhere along in there, to support the workpiece at the proper height. Bench hooks are made to hold our stuff whenever we are sawing (primarily) but it does fine for other occasions as well, such as trimming up tenons, etc.

shooting-board1

Nice shooting board, Tex!

A sort of variation on the bench hook comes with the shooting board. Designed for one thing, really, and that’s making sure the end of our stock is precisely 90 degrees square with the reference edge of the stock. Used in conjuction with a plane, the shooting board is something we want to make sure is absolutely precise and stays that way. You can tell from the Sketchup drawing at the right that our stock is placed against the fence, and a plane is placed on its side, iron oriented toward the thickest field of the shooting board, and the plane is advanced. As the plane moves toward toward the stock, the stock wants to run, but is trapped by the fence allowing the plane to shave the end grain. I added the trough between the 2 fields in order to keep shavings/dust from tipping my plane out of square. Probably overkill, but it’s mine, dagnabit. If you are a framer (as in, picture frames) you can vary this concept easily by simply changing the angle you plough your dado at. I used a 3/4 dado 1/4″ deep, which gives my 3/4 batten (for the fence) a reveal of 1/2″. This means that if I shoot any stock smaller than 1/2″, I’ll either have to plane down my fence, build another shooting board, or find somebody with a thickness planer (not!) Anyway, one can simply run a dado at 45 degrees, and there is a mitre board. Set up a shooting board for 78-1/2 degrees if you regularly to multi-sided mirror frames or clock faces. Or something.

donkey-ear-view-3

Shades of "It's a wonderful life," the Donkey's Ear.

donkey-ear-view-2

Donkey's ear -- all the resonance of Beethoven...

Miters are for putting a 45 degree angle across the face of a board. What if we want to miter the edge of the board? We go out, find the nearest Jerusalem donkey, and lop an ear off! This strange contraption is actually known as a Donkey’s ear. Note the fence on the 45 degree surface, and how that surface forms a fence for our plane to ride against as well. In use, the piece underneath the plane table is chucked into a vice, the stock held against the vice, and away we go! On any shooting board its always a good idea to have the sides of our planes lubricated a bit with paraffin or ordinary candle wax. Here’s another view of the donkey’s ear. I have measured drawings available for any of these (NO, I’m not wearing a flannel shirt and beard!) If you are interested, please email me at mack AT thewoodshepherd DOT com.

Oh yeah…

And now, a podcast!

23
Jan
09

Episode 11 – Hand Planes, Part 1

A luthier's finger plane, NOT for planing your fingers...

Luthier's finger plane (NOT for planing fingers)

I have bad news for you. Although he was a brilliant inventor, Leonard Bailey was NOT the Messiah! What he did do was advance the art of plane manufacturing, combining efficient manufacturing, good design, and good business acumen (selling his patent rights to Stanley Rule & Level Co.) Later on, he didn’t do so well because he chose to compete against the very folks (the tool giant) he sold out to. Sometimes you get the chicken, sometimes you get the feathers. Nonetheless, hand planes have certainly felt his influence.

tools-019

A sexy Stanley No.-4 from the WWII era.

This is the episode we begin to look at a huge subject, that of hand planes. Planes seem to have stirred the greatest interest of tool collectors for long enough that volumes of valuable information on history, manufacture, anomolies, and how to type many of the recognizable – and some a bit more arcane – is all readily available with a minimum expenditure of effort. As I researched information for this and the next podcast, I became increasinly impressed with the ingenuity of the Galoot; if something isn’t available, the Galoot made it. Sometimes that meant relying on the blacksmith, but it seems that, especially prior to the Civil War, that the Galoot would be so inclined to spend his own time with hammer and forge. The Bailey pattern plane, no matter what marque it bears, is the story of the Industrial Revolution and the shift away from widespread wooden plane use. We can almost track history; I offer exhibit B, a type-17 Stanley No.-4 smoothing plane with funky red-stuff handle that was painted black and the relatively tiny depth adjusting nut is made out of hard, black, rubber (recycled Jeep tires?) rather than the customary brass. This one here has become my po-boy scrub plane, which doesn’t work out real well because it still remembers it was made to be a smoother.

tools-022

My Stanley 60-1/2 with racing stripes.

It’s very important to have a really good block plane, and I have one in my 60-1/2. I like it because its a stealth conversion; someone with brilliant forethought concluded that if he (or she) added the gold metalflake paint to this plane that made his (or her) AMC Gremlin model look so cool, then that would absolutely punch holes in its value (the plane’s, not the Gremlin’s) and some struggling Galoot down the road would be able to get full functionality at a discounted price. I know that there is a God because that someone with brilliant foresight was NOT me (anyone who knows me can testify to that) and that I’ve never owned either a Gremlin or a Gremlin model. I can do better than that, actually, because one of my girlfriend’s father had given her an orange Pacer stationwagon. Everybody said, “Oh, God!” as we drove past.

tools-037

A cleverly conservative execution of a fantastic plane kit!

I will soon be blogging about my really cool Christmas present, but now is a great time for a sneak preview. My parents had obviously been peeking at Santa’s “nice” list (now just hold on a minute!) Anyway, under the synthetic, non-allergenic, non-asthma-attack-inducing genuine Canadian Pine fake Christmas tree there lay a package containing a plane kit from Ron Hock. Now, I’m one who loves to use wooden planes, but they always have been Other People’s Planes (OPP.) Now I have the chance to use one of my own, WOO-HOO! As soon as it’s finished, of course. It’s so much cooler for me now since Woodworking In America 2008, as I had the chance to meet Ron Hock himself, and sho’nuff, he’s one of us! In the podcast I make note of the fact that, like chisels, wooden planes are used in conjuction with mallets (for adjusting the plane, of course!) Here’s my set-up.

For Further Reading

Here are a few very important links for you to book mark for further study, illumination, and reference:

Patrick Leach, one of the original OldTools Listerv masterminds where he was (is) known by (among other things) the moniker, “The Merchant of Ashby,” is one of my primary dispensers of vintage Stanley iron and consequently one of the reasons I work. He has compiled a world-famous (world-wide-web famous?) cross between a subversive treatise, a hortatory sermon, and an old-time SNL feature on Stanley metallic planes known universally as Patrick’s Blood & Gore, and found here: Patrick’s Blood & Gore.

Yet another fellow Galoot, Jay Sutherland (who does not have nearly as many weird and humorous monikers as Patrick,) assembled a page in the 1990’s that breaks down the Stanley plane type study very clearly. Doing a type study on a given plane is fundamental to understanding an individual plane’s collector value (if you do that collecting sort of nonsense. I don’t.) You can find Jay’s excellent resource here: The Stanley Bench Plane Dating Page.

Patrick’s B & G, revised and illustrated by listmom Ralph Brendler and Allen Fisher here: Revised B & G

If you’re in the market for vintage Stanley baubles, I would highly recommend avoiding the eBay route where quality control can be “iffy” (yes, I know, eBay will make them play nice, etc.) I am militant in my belief regarding helping my friends prosper, so I will always recommend two Galoots I’ve had personal dealings with over the years, and have always been treated a lot better than just fairly. Patrick Leach, as already mentioned, is one, and Sandy Moss is the other (Sandy’s Tools-For-Sale page is here: Sandys Tools.) And just for the record, I’m not getting paid for this by either of these gents.

That’s it for part 1… here’s the podcast. Come back for more fun in part 2!

04
Jan
09

Episode 9 – Layout and Marking

On Layout & Marking Tools

Layout and Marking tools, while not as glamorous as infill planes, for example, are essential to Galootdom. Episode 9 of the now classic “Way of the Galoot” explores the various tools for laying out and marking that need to lurk in the Galoot’s tool chest drawers.

Rabone no-1190

Folding rule

At the right is  one of my folding rules, a crispy Rabone with a built-in protractor and level (just how cool is that?)

Superior Works marking knife

And at the left is my Superior Works cocobolo handle (www.supertool.com).  This knife is made by Patrick Leach, old tool monger (and now new old tool monger,)  Stanley plane expert, and author of the famous “Patrick’s Blood and Gore.”

tools-004

At the right is a Stanley sliding bevel gauge.  Note the clever use of staining fluid on the benchtop; this is done for the same reason that we tattoo horses’ gums…

Trammels

Trammel points

And a groovy set of trammel points.  I’d be afraid to use these, knowing my own work habits.

As always, this is but a mere surface scratching (pun intended) as to the availability of good marking tools.  I promise you that the tools pictured here are far superior to crayons…

And as always, here is the podcast:

Video thumbnail. Click to play

24
Dec
08

Episode 6: The Galoot Toolchest

Power tools, while they have a distinct an unique “gadget value,” are often too expensive for the hobbyist woodworker. An increasing number of individuals are flocking to hand tool woodworking to save money and space, and because they are seeking the therapeutic value the solace of quiet woodworking offers.

In this episode, we examine the nine categories of tools that would be found in a Joiner’s (cabinet maker’s or furniture builder’s) tool chest. Come along as we continue to equip our shop for the adventure of Galootdom!

[blip.tv ?posts_id=1581268&dest=-1]

24
Dec
08

Episode 5: The Galoot Workshop

This week we take a brief look at the fundamental link to the Galoot and his or her environment… the workshop. We consider questions that need to be answered for the Galoot to optimize the workshop. Also, we consider a woodworking lesson I’ve learned.


[blip.tv ?posts_id=1547466&dest=-1]




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